Born Of An Atom Bomb

Image and thought dump for the various projects of Jared Axelrod

Author of The Battle of Blood & Ink and The Cockroach Strikes

Battle of Blood and Ink

#misc

vmagazine:

The Interiors of Wes Anderson’ in the latest issue of Apartamento #13

“You could compare Wes Anderson to an interior decorator,”says  Apartamento’s Editor-in-Chief Marco Velardi of today’s enchanting series, taken from the bi-annual title’s latest issue. With the director and screenwriter’s private house strictly off limits, the magazine traces the meticulously considered art of set design in his filmography: miniature brownstone apartments, nostalgic color schemes and embroidered and elaborate costumes. “I always say that a picture of someone’s home tells you a lot more about that person than any portrait possibly can,” muses Nacho Alegre, director and co-founder of Apartamento. “I imagine in a movie the time you have to describe a character is limited, so using the interiors to do so probably becomes something of a necessity.” An intricate visual language has become Anderson’s trademark; in his hands, set design becomes both a storytelling device and character trope, from his shot-on-a-shoestring debut, Bottle Rocket, to his latest saccharine fantasia, The Grand Budapest Hotel. Velardi adds: “Ultimately, if you look at his work there are a lot of interiors, with very peculiar and very precise work on the spaces and what people wear; Wes is passionate about every single detail, and that’s why it’s fascinating for us.”  

h/t nowness

One of costume designer, Eiko Ishioka’s outfits for Dracula was directly influenced by Gustav Klimt’s passionate masterpiece, ‘The Kiss’ (1907-1908). Embroidery by Penn & Fletcher.

“Six mistakes mankind keeps making century after century:
Believing that personal gain is made by crushing others;
Worrying about things that cannot be changed or corrected;
Insisting that a thing is impossible because we cannot accomplish it;
Refusing to set aside trivial preferences;
Neglecting development and refinement of the mind;
Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.”

Cicero, 106 BC - 43 BC

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Wayne Lawrence

Orchard Beach: The Bronx Riviera

Although New York’s Bronx is considered one of the most diverse communities in America out of which many subcultures originated, such as Hip Hop and Salsa, it’s still viewed as a no man’s land by many of the city’s inhabitants. Perhaps it is a matter of simple geography that many refuse to venture to the northernmost of the city’s five boroughs or, quite possibly, it may be the Borough’s malevolent reputation lingering from its tumultuous past.

From its earliest years, the Bronx has been a hotbed of immigrant working class families, but its image has largely been defined by the urban blight of the late 1960’s through to the 1980’s when arson, drug addiction and social neglect decimated many of its neighborhoods. For the families who have called this scarred landscape home, Orchard Beach, the only beach in the borough, was and remains a treasured respite from the sweltering confines of the concrete jungle. Built in the 1930s by urban planner Robert Moses, the beach carries the stigma as being one of the worst in New York and is commonly known as Horseshit Beach or Chocha Beach.

I began shooting portraits of Orchard Beach’s summertime regulars in 2005 shortly after moving to New York, realizing that the stigma attached to this oasis was largely unjustified - I felt compelled to engage with this community of working class families and colorful characters. The photographs in ‘Orchard Beach – The Bronx Riviera’ celebrate the pride and dignity of the beach’s visitors, working-class people.

Immediately catching the viewer’s eye is the extravagant style of many of the photographs’ subjects – a quest for identity and sense of belonging. Some individuals carry scars and markings that hint to their own personal histories, which often reflect the complex history of the borough itself. Within the gaze of those portrayed we see a community standing in defiance of popular opinion.

The six years I spent photographing Orchard Beach have not only given me the time and space to reflect on the importance of family and community, but also a sense of belonging and purpose. After having experienced the most profound grief when my older brother was brutally murdered, photography has not only offered me an opportunity to give a voice to a community often misunderstood but also a means of healing from the loss experienced.

— Wayne Lawrence / INSTITUTE

Via

atlasobscura:

BROKEN HILL SCULPTURE SYMPOSIUM -BROKEN HILL, AUSTRALIA
Twelve sculptures designed to make their best showing with the coming or going of the sun
At the top of Sundown Hill, twelve sandstone sculptures stand against the vivid sunsets of the Living Desert Sanctuary.
These iconic symbols of the Australian Outback were created by twelve different artists from around the world. Sculptors from Georgia, Mexico, Siriya, Bathhurst Island and Australia contributed to the sculpture symposium, using a total of 53 tons of sandstone between them. The project was directed and organized in 1993 by artist Lawrence Beck.
Discover more unique places at Atlas Obscura…

atlasobscura:

BROKEN HILL SCULPTURE SYMPOSIUM -BROKEN HILL, AUSTRALIA

Twelve sculptures designed to make their best showing with the coming or going of the sun

At the top of Sundown Hill, twelve sandstone sculptures stand against the vivid sunsets of the Living Desert Sanctuary.

These iconic symbols of the Australian Outback were created by twelve different artists from around the world. Sculptors from Georgia, Mexico, Siriya, Bathhurst Island and Australia contributed to the sculpture symposium, using a total of 53 tons of sandstone between them. The project was directed and organized in 1993 by artist Lawrence Beck.

Discover more unique places at Atlas Obscura…